Trip Report – Mt. Washington – 20 Feb 2019

Six of us had another spectacular snowshoe outing to Rampart Hill.  The snow and sunshine have persisted with the arctic high.  There was a cool breeze, but it was warm in the sun.  We had a few clues about the location of a hut from previous outings, and we thought we would go look for it.  We climbed steeply up the open bluffs above the parking area and enjoyed the great views.  We followed the broken trail, undulating and meandering through the knolls in the open.  We stopped for lunch in a sunny, sheltered spot where we were joined by at least six Canada Jays.  We noticed a number of people visiting the next knoll south of us and decided that must be where the hut was.  So we found it perhaps by luck.  After checking out the hut, we descended to a snow-covered logging road and made a loop back to the vehicles.   4.6 km; 2¼ hours.

Debbie

Thanks to Norris and Les for the photos

(click on photos to view larger)

Snow – Mt. Washington – 20 Feb 2019

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Trip Report – Mt. Washington – 13 Feb 2019

Four of us and a dog snowshoed at Ramparts Hill in deep powder.  For the coast, the quality of the snow was exceptional and the sun was glorious.  There were quite a lot of others out enjoying the day and we had our choice of broken or unbroken routes.  We wandered along the open bluffs facing east with views of Sutil Channel and the mainland mountains.  We tried out some steep descents, ascents and had lunch at the top of a knoll before heading back to the car.   6.1 km; 3 hours.

Debbie

Thanks to Norris for the photos

(click on photos to view larger)

Snow – Mt. Washington – 13 Feb 2019

Trip Report – Snowden Forest – 6 Feb 2019

Four club members and two guests, one two-legged and one four-legged, enjoyed a beautiful hike through the Snowden Forest on Feb 6, taking some main trails and several mountain bike trails. Starting out the temperature was about -5 but warmed up to just above freezing later in the morning, full sunshine all day. There was a very light skiff of snow in patches and on exposed areas, frequent frost heaves along the trails, ponds were frozen and Riley Lake nearly so, as determined by our four-footed guest.

We were able to access Snowden Forest via the recently re-opened dam road, considerably reducing the driving time. We parked at the Lost Lake parking lot, headed north on Trimac, then around the east side of Lost Lake, cutting off onto Scotty’s which meandered over the bluffs to the north and west of Lost Lake. We then followed Oggie’s, passing by the west side of Riley Lake. Lunch break was on a small open bluff in the snow. We returned via Trimac again. 2.5 hrs walking, 6 km. We noted the trails to the south and west of Riley Lake for further exploration; with the dam road open, access to this extensive and well-maintained trail network is once again quick and easy.

Valerie van Veen

Thanks to  Les and Val for the photos

(click on photos to enlarge)

Hiking – Snowden Forest – 6 Feb 2019

Trip Report – Blindman’s Bluff – 30 Jan 2019

Seven of us set out for Blindman’s Bluff.  We went in from Lieshman’s Road instead of the regular way on the Copperhead logging road because of the washed out culvert.  The forecast sunshine failed to show up, but the overcast was high enough to give us some peeks at the surrounding mountains.  The moss and lichen were wonderful.  On the way back, the group decided to take the regular trail and look at the washed out culvert, the new and improved beaver dam, which replaces the one that broke, and also visit the copper mine site.  5.3 km; 2¾ hours.

Norris

(click on photos to enlarge)

Hiking – Blindman’s Bluff – 30 Jan 2019

Trip Report – Carrington Bay, Cortes – 23 Jan 2019

Eight of us had spectacular weather for our trip to the Children’s Forest on Cortes Island, including Carrington Bay and the Grandmother’s Grove.  We took the 9:05 ferry to Cortes and the views of Sutil Channel, the mainland and Vancouver Island mountains couldn’t have been better.  We were met by Sabina who guided us through the forest and told us so much about the efforts of the community to acquire this forest, so that this incredibly diverse and important habitat can remain intact. Sabina shared her amazing knowledge about so many topics including lichen and moss, wolves, wildlife trees, flying squirrels and owls and so much more.  We continued on to Carrington Bay and the tidal lagoon, and crossed the narrow channel through which the tide was rushing out.  We walked to the swim rock and sat in the sun for a leisurely lunch admiring the mergansers, golden eye ducks and a curious seal.  From there we continued on to Grandmothers Grove, a beautiful old growth stand of spruce and cedar, in the James Creek watershed which also supports cutthroat trout and spawning salmon. The greens of the mosses were vibrant after all the recent rain.  We followed the trail and logging roads back in a loop and made a short variation on the James Creek Trail before returning to the vehicles and the ferry. 10.4 km; 5 hours.

Thanks so much to Margot for organizing this event and to Sabina for sharing her enthusiasm and knowledge with us.

Debbie

(click on photos to view larger)

Here is a short video of the area using mostly drone footage:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-zs5BjQo2U

Hiking – Carrington Bay – 23 Jan 2019

Trip Report – Mt. Washington – 16 Jan 2019

For our first outing of the year to Mt. Washington, we had two for x-country skiing and nine for snowshoeing.  The snowshoers did a loop in the morning of Old Cabin, Tree Beard and Rossiter’s Rise, then returned to Raven Lodge for lunch.  In the afternoon, we made a loop of Old Cabin and Crooked Creek.  The skies were a bit overcast, the snow somewhat crunchy and the breeze was fairly bracing.  Two of us had binding issues and found it easier to walk; the trail was completely firm so no problem.  Everyone got enough exercise and we finished up around 2:30.  7.7 km; 3¾ hours.

Debbie

Photos by Norris

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Snow – Mt. Washington – 16 Jan 2019

Trip Report – Q Cove Trails – 1 Jan 2019

The trip into the woods south of the library was scheduled for 2 Jan, but the weatherman was saying heavy rain and high winds, so we moved the trip up to 1 Jan at the last moment.  In the morning there was a very light rain, which was hardly noticeable in the woods.  So nine of us wandered off into the maze of community trails, all unofficial.  This is all private property, so many of the trails connect to someone’s back yard. Some of the trails are on what seems to be easements which extend existing roads.  The main part of property is in the Official Community Plan as a place for future housing.  Until then, it’s a pleasant forest to stroll through, with quite a few small streams and some impressively big cottonwood trees. The trails are well maintained.  The community has decorated the woods with carved masks, beadwork, and a “Word Log”.  We also visited the new stairs connecting Nole Road and Plaza Road.

While we were walking near the end of Nole Road, one of the alders leaning over the trail ahead of us decided to fall across the trail.  There was no wind, no gust of wind, it just decided to fall over for no reason, as alders do. Luckily, we were not too close and not in the wrong place at the wrong time.  Back at the cars, Les provided a little New Year’s tail gate treat with chocolate and pineapple.  4.3 km; 1¾ hours.

Norris

Photos by Norris

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Hiking – Q Cove Trails – 2 Jan 2019